Hallucinogens

Derived from the Latin word alucinare, meaning "to wander in mind, talk idly, or prate," hallucinogens are drugs that have the ability to change one's thought process, mood, and perceptions of reality.

Hallucinogens are a class of drugs encapsulating three broad categories: lysergic acid diethylamides (LDS), dimethyltryptamines (DMT), and phencyclidines (PCP). Commonly referred to as acid, blotter, microdot, magic mushrooms, trip, yellow sunshine, and many other names, hallucinogenic drugs give users extreme and radical sensory experiences. [ref] Kuhn, Cynthia, Scott Swartzwelder, Wilkie Wilson, Leigh Heather. Wilson, and Jeremy Foster. Buzzed: the Straight Facts about the Most Used and Abused Drugs from Alcohol to Ecstasy [/ref]

Albert Hofmann, the chemist who first synthesized LSD, underwent a self-experiment and swallowed a small portion of the substance (250 micro-grams) in the lab. The effects were profound; he reported a succession of terrifying sensory experiences:

"Everything in the room spun around, and the familiar objects and pieces of furniture assumed grotesque, threatening forms. They were in continuous motion, animated, as if driven by and inner restlessness. …Every exertion of my will, every attempt to put an end to the disintegration of the outer world and the dissolution of my ego, seemed to be wasted effort. A demon had invaded me."

This demon was the hallucinogenic drug.[ref] http://drugabuse.gov/PDF/RRHalluc.pdf [/ref]

Effects of Hallucinogens

Hallucinogenic drugs constitute a unique and somewhat obscure sort of addiction. The hallucinogenic effect, or the "buzz," varies incredibly. An addict can ingest an LSD drug today, and then the tomorrow ingest the same drug and experience an entirely different response.

Because much of the drug's influence is entirely mental, the consumer's emotional state shapes his overall experience. Even the users setting and expectations can dramatically influence the drug's effect.

Common hallucinogenic effects from a small dose include:

  • Feelings of detachment from the surroundings
  • Emotional swings
  • An altered sense of space and time [ref] Kuhn, Cynthia, Scott Swartzwelder, Wilkie Wilson, Leigh Heather. Wilson, and Jeremy Foster. Buzzed: the Straight Facts about the Most Used and Abused Drugs from Alcohol to Ecstasy [/ref]

Hallucinogen Threats [ref] Kuhn, Cynthia, Scott Swartzwelder, Wilkie Wilson, Leigh Heather. Wilson, and Jeremy Foster. Buzzed: the Straight Facts about the Most Used and Abused Drugs from Alcohol to Ecstasy [/ref]

Hallucinogenic drugs threaten the body both physically and psychologically. Long term threats include:

  • Flashbacks
  • Mood swings
  • Impaired thinking
  • Unexpected outbursts of violence
  • Depression that could lead to death or suicide

The fabrications of reality caused by hallucinogen drugs threaten the well-being of the abuser and those he comes in contact with. A user's perception can become so distorted that he can seriously injure or kill himself.

For example, reports of people attempting to fly jumping from high buildings have been told. [ref] http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/exchange/node/1880 [/ref]

Hallucinogens Use in India

The alleged increasing availability of Hallucinogens in India is causing an increase in use, especially amongst youngsters.

Recent drug trend research shows that the hallucinogenic drug, LSD, has nearly doubled in use since 2007. And according to the director of the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, Michael Farrell says, “The percentage of regular drug users who also use LSD has also risen dramatically.” [ref]http://www.hillsnews.com.au/news/national/national/general/lsd-twice-as-popular-among-younger-users-as-availability-increases/2359273.aspx [/ref]

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