Family Members and Insecurities About Addiction Treatment

This is a guest blog post written by Azhar, a recovering addict who works at Shafa Home. The views & opinions expressed in any guest post featured on our site are those of the guest author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions & views of DeAddictionCentres.IN as a whole. We are thrilled to have guest contributors, and if you are interested in contributing to our blog in the future, please contact us.


In a family counseling meeting, a mother asked if her son would be able to adjust to treatment, a question often asked by concerned family members. In order to give a helpful answer, our counselor modified the mother’s question. The counselor asked her to think whether her son would be able to survive without drugs; whether he would perform daily activities without hallucinations; whether he would live a fruitful and productive life. This question changed the whole perspective. Instead of concentrating solely on the comforts of the patient, the focus was shifted to the importance of the patient’s ability to accept rehabilitation.

When a new resident enters treatment for the first time, leaving their drugs behind, it is no surprise that they lose patience. They begin to crave the opportunity to fall back into their previous lifestyle and start taking drugs. Even going to treatment facilities that provide the best conditions for rehabilitation still did not take away their inextinguishable desire for drugs. For this reason, our primary concern is not the patient’s comfort, but helping him fight his addiction. AT SHAFA, we mix the necessary comfort with a strict routine in order to give each patient the best opportunity for recovery.

Another question people often ask is, what is the minimum time it takes for a person to complete treatment. Incorporating previous experiences, we assume it will take approximately two to three months for a full recovery. Treatment duration can be reduced with the support of a patient’s family. With the love and overwhelming support of a family, patients often respond to treatment much quicker.

Another reason family members tend to be anxious about their loved one’s addiction is the amount of times they’ve seen their loved one have an emotional outburst. After many similar experiences we’ve come to realize that they have always been emotional in front of their loved ones but in return the addict has always blackmailed them. These feelings were used by the addict for his own convenience. Addicts take undue advantage of the family members and take their love and affection for granted. Unless and until families learn to see through the emotional blackmail of their loved ones, no treatment can be successful and complete.

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